The Institute for Psychoanalytic Studies in Architecture is a collective of academics, clinicians, and practitoners interested in relating architecture theory to the Freudian–Lacanian field. The group sponsors discussions, round-tables, workshops, symposia, and public conferences following the schMOOZ model (reverse-zooming) that begins with small–group conversations on topics of common interest and aims to produce publicly accessible videos, scholarly papers, a journal, and books. Membership is open to any interested readers of psychoanalysis with an interest in the built environment, the landscape, and places created in fiction, art, photography, and film. CONTACT: architecture.lacan.ipsa@gmail.com.The iPSA web site is a collection of PDF files, optimizing members' access and control to displayed materials. Use this page as an index and guide.

the latest

main page: introduction to iPSA

iPSA maintains regular discussions on topics of mutual interest. These spin–off to stand–alone projects involving research, conferencing, and work with other groups. Topics reflect the members’ scholarly and clinical interests as well as their involvement in architectural practice and teaching. Projects elect to follow the three–part schMOOZ design of sessions for free discussion, session(s) with invited critics, and formal conferences open to the public where presentations and papers are made available before sessions to allow maximum time for discussion. All projects aim to add to the group’s archive of published essays, interviews, and videos.

news: announcements, links, events

Calls for papers, deadlines for upcoming schMOOZ events, links to other groups, updates on members' ongoing projects. The NEWS page is published six times a year and archived.

projects: ongoing zoom seminars, conferences, videos

iPSA maintains regular discussions on topics of mutual interest. These spin–off to stand–alone projects involving research, conferencing, and work with other groups. Topics reflect the members’ scholarly and clinical interests as well as their involvement in architectural practice and teaching. Projects elect to follow the three–part schMOOZ design of sessions for free discussion, session(s) with invited critics, and formal conferences open to the public where presentations and papers are made available before sessions to allow maximum time for discussion. All projects aim to add to the group’s archive of published essays, interviews, and videos.

members: founding members and affiliates

Founding members include: Wouter van Acker, John Hendrix. Lorens Holm, Don Kunze, Nadir Lahiji, Tim Martin, Cameron McEwan, and Andrew Payne. Affiliate members get updated information about iPSA activities and are invited to participate in schMOOZ events, publish in the online journal Psyche Extended, and enlisted as outside reviewers and visiting critics.

schedules: upcoming meetings and zoom symposia

Scheduling of iPSA activities is generally based on a bi-weekly pattern of beginnings and middles of each month. The group schedules informal general meetings as well as theme–based reverse–zoom discussions that lead to formal symposia and public conferences.

journal: psyche extended, a bi-annual online forum

Psyche Extended is jPSA's online journal, published twice a year — a collection of essays, clinical studies, reviews, response articles, and position papers about the relations of (Lacanian) psychoanalysis to architecture, the landscape, and places created in art, photography, fiction, and film. The journal aims to map the provocative spaces between the political pamphlet, the travel guide, and the novel. Psyche Extended encourages critical theory, speculative writing, exposition, and critical reviews. It requires direct engagement of the writings and ideas of Jacques Lacan, Sigmund Freud, and critical secondary sources in the study of architectural conditions in terms of therapy, enjoyment, fantasy, the public good, and technology in relation of psychoanalysis to architecture. Critical reviews of published works, as well as responses from original authors, are encouraged.

schMOOZ: from local to global with "reverse Zoom" collaboration

The reverse–zoom design aims (1) to encourage collaboration and debate before collective live events and (2) to create accessible, durable resources to engage a broader audience. The schMOOZ design reverses the standard conference design, where a small group of organisers announce a topic, set a deadline for submissions, then approve/disprove and sort the results. Participants prepare materials that are not seen until the day of the session, where limited time rules out the possibility of extended discussion, even though virtual conferences have no space–time limits that mandate these restrictive practices. The schMOOZ design reverses the standard design by creating discussion groups that autonomously develop topics and form revised views through debate and review. Formality is stepped up, from brainstorming to public symposia, where presentation materials are available beforehand thanks to YouTube archives and full papers made available on the Internet. Conference sessions clear the way for discussion among group members, invited critics, and the audience.

working papers: peer review of anything from sketches to final editions

The iPSA site receives and posts notes, sketches, first drafts, and works–in–progress of all kinds, with the implicit invitation for comments. Each working paper is an announcement of intent; a commitment to work in progress as an existential condition (the project is never complete). As comrades of schMOOZ discourse, our support for each other is shown by putting works–in–progress into the public domain.

purpose: why the psychoanalytical study of architecture?

iPSA, the “institute for the psychoanalytic study of architecture,” devotes itself to “the Freudian–Lacanian field.” Jacques Lacan and Sigmund Freud developed ideas that have survived to constitute a stark contrast with psychology and psychiatry, the mainstream disciplines claiming to have mapped the human mind. Lacan realized the value of Freud’s key achievements: the unconscious, the concept of the Other, the drives, and (especially) the controversial death drive. Lacan’s annual seminars, essays, conference lectures and public appearances contributed to his reputation as opaque and unreadable. But, thanks to new translations and the work of groups such as Écrits, LACK, the LacanSalon, Lacan Toronto, the Affiliated Psychoanalytic Workgroups, FLi (Freud/Lacan Institute), Das Unbehagen, and others, dynamic new scholarship is coming into view, with a invigorating exchanges between theory and practice. In contrast, contemporary interest in psychoanalysis in architecture theory is meagre and misshapen. Architecture theory’s addiction to cognitive psychology and phenomenology has contaminated its representations of the unconscious and cemented its opposition to concepts such as the Other and the death drive. iPSA aims to change these conditions.

Keywords: Jacques Lacan, Sigmund Freud, architecture theory, therapeutic space design, schMOOZ conferencing, iPSA, Psyche Extended (journal), workshops on Lacan-Architecture, Architecture's Big Other, éxtimité, lathouse, alethosphere, the architectural imagination, the (architectural) unconscious; fictional places; Stendhal Syndrome, psychoanalysis of landscapes and cities, film study, ancient cities.